Author Archives: CWCC

Delegation – Delegating the Task & the Authority

By Amy L Shoemaker, President and Owner of Amy L Shoemaker Partnerships, LLC and CWCC Member

I have met some incredibly bright and talented leaders.  When the topic of “delegation” comes up, they grimace and comment that they need to get better at that!

This is a 3 part blog on Delegation Tips for Success – What to Delegate, How to Effectively Delegate and Delegating the Task and the Authority.

Delegating the Task and the Authority
Once you have identified What you can Delegate, and have planned Who and How will you delegate, it’s time to also consider how much of the task and authority for completing the task should be delegated.

  Delegate the Task Delegate the Authority
Level One Get the facts, do the research I’ll decide and retain the authority
Level Two Suggest alternatives based on the employee’s research I’ll discuss the alternatives which the employee suggests and retain the authority
Level Three Do the research, consider options and decide on a solution Review your solution with me and I retain final approval for the solution
Level Four Do the research, consider options and decide on a solution Implement the employee’s solution unless I ask to be included in advance
Level Five Do the research, consider options, and implement your solution Implement the solution and report the results to me
Level Six Do the research, consider options, and implement your solution Implement the solution and only report the results if the solution is unsuccessful
Level Seven Do the research, consider options, and implement your solution Implement the solution and reporting is not needed

Each assignment may be delegated at a different level based on the experience of the employee in completing that task.  When an employee is promoted, you may retain more authority for new assignments until you are comfortable that the employee is knowledgeable in their new responsibilities.

Please take a few minutes to decide the level of delegation for each task and the authority you are able to delegate for that task.  Then delegate the 3 projects or assignments you identified and clearly identify the action and authority you are delegating to your employees so they can be successful.

If you are interested in learning more about what skills are needed to advance your career, take a look at the Corporate Executive Leadership Academy offered at the Colorado Women’s Chamber.

 

Amy Shoemaker Headshot 2014About Amy L. Shoemaker, PHR, SHRM-CP, CMC, EMBA
Amy Shoemaker utilizes more than 25 years of business experience in human resources and training to provide strategic human resource consulting, executive coaching and leadership development, and merger and acquisition leadership integration.  She uses her 18 years experience as a vice president and strategic HR leader in entrepreneurial mid-size, and Fortune 500 corporations to exceed her clients’ expectations.  Amy develops future leaders by serving as adjunct faculty and content adviser for the Master’s in Strategic Human Resources program at The University of Denver.  She is adjunct faculty for Colorado State University’s Veterinary Management Institute and Beverage Business Institute.

Education and Certifications

  • Wichita State University, Executive Masters in Business Administration (EMBA)
  • Stanford Graduate School of Business, Human Resources Executive Program
  • Cornell University – Diversity Course Employer Adviser
  • HR Certification Institute, Professional in Human Resources (PHR)
  • Behavioral Coaching Institution, Certified Master Coach (CMC)
  • CPI 260 Leadership Assessment, Certified Practitioner
  • Emergenetics International, Certified Associate
  • Thomas Killman Instrument – Conflict Resolution Style

Professional Associations and Civic Groups

  • Colorado Women’s Chamber of Commerce, Facilitator/Founder Corporate Leadership Academy
  • Mile High SHRM Chapter, Board of Directors- Professional Development Groups
  • Northern Colorado Human Resource Association, Board of Directors, Conference Chair
  • Rocky Mountain HR People & Strategy, member

Contact:  amy@shoemakerpartnerships.com;
Office: 303-993-2364;    Mobile: 316-305-7972
Website: ShoemakerPartnerships.com
LinkedIn: Amy L Shoemaker

Delegation – How to Effectively Delegate

By Amy L Shoemaker, President and Owner of Amy L Shoemaker Partnerships, LLC and CWCC Member

I have met some incredibly bright and talented leaders.  When the topic of “delegation” comes up, they grimace and comment that they need to get better at that!

This is a 3 part blog on Delegation Tips for Success – What to Delegate, How to Effectively Delegate and Delegating the Task and the Authority.

How to Effectively Delegate
Once you have identified What you can Delegate, it’s time to plan Who and How will you delegate.

  1. Evaluate Delegation Needs – grab the list you created last week of assignments you are going to delegate and then walk through these questions.
  2. Prepare to delegate the assignment –
    1. What is the Task?
    2. What is the Responsibility level and intended results?
    3. What resources are available if the employee needs help?
    4. How does completing the assignment benefit the employee doing the work? Will the skills help advance their career or provide them with more opportunities to complete creative work?
    5. What follow up will you do?
  3. Select the right person
    1. Does the work belong to a particular position?
    2. Who has the interest or motivation to do the work?
    3. Who has the skills to do the work?
    4. Who could be challenged by doing the work?
    5. Who has time to do the work?
  4. Make the assignment – set a day and time to meet with your employee and give them the project and information you identified in step 2.
  5. Follow-up
    1. Periodically check your level of involvement – too much or not enough?
    2. Provide coaching and resources as needed
    3. Intervene when necessary to keep the project on track
    4. Share responsibility for success and “limited success” with the employee
  6. Evaluate the completed work and the process
    1. Review the work with the employee
    2. Give feedback and document their performance
    3. Obtain their feedback regarding your level of involvement – too much or not enough?

Please take a few minutes to decide when you are going to delegate the 3 projects or assignments you identified and identify what information and support you need to provide your employees so they can be successful.

If you are interested in learning more about what skills are needed to advance your career, take a look at the Corporate Executive Leadership Academy offered at the Colorado Women’s Chamber.

 

Amy Shoemaker Headshot 2014About Amy L. Shoemaker, PHR, SHRM-CP, CMC, EMBA
Amy Shoemaker utilizes more than 25 years of business experience in human resources and training to provide strategic human resource consulting, executive coaching and leadership development, and merger and acquisition leadership integration.  She uses her 18 years experience as a vice president and strategic HR leader in entrepreneurial mid-size, and Fortune 500 corporations to exceed her clients’ expectations.  Amy develops future leaders by serving as adjunct faculty and content adviser for the Master’s in Strategic Human Resources program at The University of Denver.  She is adjunct faculty for Colorado State University’s Veterinary Management Institute and Beverage Business Institute.

Education and Certifications

  • Wichita State University, Executive Masters in Business Administration (EMBA)
  • Stanford Graduate School of Business, Human Resources Executive Program
  • Cornell University – Diversity Course Employer Adviser
  • HR Certification Institute, Professional in Human Resources (PHR)
  • Behavioral Coaching Institution, Certified Master Coach (CMC)
  • CPI 260 Leadership Assessment, Certified Practitioner
  • Emergenetics International, Certified Associate
  • Thomas Killman Instrument – Conflict Resolution Style

Professional Associations and Civic Groups

  • Colorado Women’s Chamber of Commerce, Facilitator/Founder Corporate Leadership Academy
  • Mile High SHRM Chapter, Board of Directors- Professional Development Groups
  • Northern Colorado Human Resource Association, Board of Directors, Conference Chair
  • Rocky Mountain HR People & Strategy, member

Contact:  amy@shoemakerpartnerships.com;
Office: 303-993-2364;    Mobile: 316-305-7972
Website: ShoemakerPartnerships.com
LinkedIn: Amy L Shoemaker

Delegation – Developing or Dumping?

By Amy L Shoemaker, President and Owner of Amy L Shoemaker Partnerships, LLC and CWCC Member

I have met some incredibly bright and talented leaders.  When the topic of “delegation” comes up, they grimace and comment that they need to get better at that!

This is a 3 part blog on Delegation Tips for Success – What to Delegate, How to Effectively Delegate and Delegating the Task and the Authority.

What to Delegate

All of us have items on our desk which we should delegate.

  1. Let’s start with that procrastination stack, which is usually on your credenza, on the floor, or hidden in a drawer. If you were motivated to complete it, the project utilized your strengths and you were the best person to complete it – You Would Have Done It by Now!  Let’s accept that you’re not the best person to complete it and delegate the task to someone else who is a better fit.  You may have been the best person at one point in your career – however are you the best person today?
  2. Other items you should delegate include repetitive routine tasks or decisions for you which could be a development opportunity for new employees on your team.
  3. Delegating projects that cross train your employees to increase flexibility of the workload and your team’s coverage when absences occur.
  4. Delegate opportunities to use and reinforce creative talents on your team which could add value to the project.
  5. When you are more concerned that something gets done and less concerned with how it gets done, consider delegating it. Then ask yourself – is it wrong or is it different?  If there is more than one “right” way to complete a task, this is a great task to delegate and let your employees learn from completing the new responsibility.

Please take a few minutes to identify at least 3 projects or items on your desk today which could be delegated.

If you are interested in learning more about what skills are needed to advance your career, take a look at the Corporate Executive Leadership Academy offered at the Colorado Women’s Chamber.

 

Amy Shoemaker Headshot 2014About Amy L. Shoemaker, PHR, SHRM-CP, CMC, EMBA
Amy Shoemaker utilizes more than 25 years of business experience in human resources and training to provide strategic human resource consulting, executive coaching and leadership development, and merger and acquisition leadership integration.  She uses her 18 years experience as a vice president and strategic HR leader in entrepreneurial mid-size, and Fortune 500 corporations to exceed her clients’ expectations.  Amy develops future leaders by serving as adjunct faculty and content adviser for the Master’s in Strategic Human Resources program at The University of Denver.  She is adjunct faculty for Colorado State University’s Veterinary Management Institute and Beverage Business Institute.

Education and Certifications

  • Wichita State University, Executive Masters in Business Administration (EMBA)
  • Stanford Graduate School of Business, Human Resources Executive Program
  • Cornell University – Diversity Course Employer Adviser
  • HR Certification Institute, Professional in Human Resources (PHR)
  • Behavioral Coaching Institution, Certified Master Coach (CMC)
  • CPI 260 Leadership Assessment, Certified Practitioner
  • Emergenetics International, Certified Associate
  • Thomas Killman Instrument – Conflict Resolution Style

Professional Associations and Civic Groups

  • Colorado Women’s Chamber of Commerce, Facilitator/Founder Corporate Leadership Academy
  • Mile High SHRM Chapter, Board of Directors- Professional Development Groups
  • Northern Colorado Human Resource Association, Board of Directors, Conference Chair
  • Rocky Mountain HR People & Strategy, member

Contact:  amy@shoemakerpartnerships.com;
Office: 303-993-2364;    Mobile: 316-305-7972
Website: ShoemakerPartnerships.com
LinkedIn: Amy L Shoemaker

Congratulations on Your Promotion! (Now What?)

By Brenda Hampel, Founder and Partner of Connect the Dots Consulting and
CWCC Member

CTD Transparent Logo

The transition from high performing “doer” to effective “leader” can be a challenging process!

Congratulations on Your Promotion!  (Now What?)
Marissa was a high-performer, used to being the “go-to” person for solving problems, exceeding performance expectations, and effectively leading key projects..  These impressive contributions caught the attention of her department head, and, as a result, Marissa was promoted to Manager after only 2 years in her former role.  However, the new role became a challenge for Marissa as she tried to figure out when to be a “doer” and how to be a leader. She needed to gain clarity about her new role and figure out how to manage her boss’ expectations, as well as those of her direct reports.

Strategies for making a successful transition:
The transition from high performing “doer” to effective “leader” can be challenging, as many of the skills that allowed you to be promoted will not be used as much as before.

  • Define the role: What skills led you to be chosen for the job?  How can you use your past successes to inform your managerial style?
  • Assess expectations: What is your manager’s perspective on what work, projects, and tasks you should be managing and which ones you should be doing?
  • Manage up: Communicate with your boss regularly to keep him in the loop about your successes and challenges. In Marissa’s case, we created a one-page update/agenda template for all regular touch-base meetings with her boss.

Leader’s Reaction:
Marissa was open to the strategies, but a little skeptical that she was up to the new role.  But, she was willing to try the approach.

Outcome:
Because Marissa’s boss still sees her as the go-to person, she has had to really think about what to take on and what to “push back” when she feels like she is getting pulled into the detail.  Frequent communication and alignment with her manager has been key, and they are making significant progress.  Marissa feels better about her new role and is seeing the results of getting things accomplished through others and not doing it all herself.

If you are interested in learning more about what skills are needed to advance your career, take a look at the Innovative Leadership Institute offered at the Colorado Women’s Chamber.

 

Brenda Hampel HeadshotAbout Brenda
As Founder and Partner of Connect the Dots Consulting, Brenda has taken her expertise in the areas of leadership, team alignment, performance and onboarding coaching—and helps organizations design and implement solutions that combine proven methodology with practical business application.

Brenda’s specialty is in the facilitation of leadership team sessions and discussions. Her years of experience as both a corporate human resources executive and management consultant and business acumen allow her to facilitate complex and difficult discussions by creating a framework, surfacing the necessary information and input, then pulling it together and creating commitments for next steps. This powerful process allows organizations to pinpoint with laser-like accuracy the areas that need attention so they can reach their goals faster.

Brenda graduated from The Ohio State University with a BA in Communications. She is a speaker and co-author of the books published by McGraw-Hill, Solving Employee Performance Problems: How to Spot Problems Early, Take Appropriate Action, and Bring Out the Best in Everyone, Perfect Phrases for New Employee Orientation and Onboarding: Hundreds of Ready-to-use Phrases to Train and Retain Your Top Talent, and, and Talent Assessment and Development Pocket Tool Kit: How to Get the Most Out of Your Best People. The Talent and Development Assessment Pocket Toolkit, also published by McGraw-Hill

 

Communicate Tough Messages with Compassion

By Amy L Shoemaker, President and Owner of Amy L Shoemaker Partnerships, LLC and CWCC Member

Over 85% of Leaders dread communicating tough messages.  They want to help their employee be successful, but don’t want to hurt their feelings or risk demotivating them.  How do you communicate tough messages with compassion?

Two Purposes of a Coaching Conversation:

  1. Your first goal is to communicate your concern in a kind and compassion manner
    1. Seek to understand and be understood – describe the behaviors you are observing today and clearly communicate what success looks like!
    2. Create awareness so their behavior is a choice rather than a habit – what other options exist at work to successfully do their job
    3. Seek accuracy – clarify successful job performance and answer their questions to ensure they understand the desired performance or behavior
    4. Offer to create a shift – how can you support their new behavior
  2. Your second goal is to Produce a New Result
    1. Outcome of the Conversation – agree on the new behavior or performance with the employee
    2. Problem Solved – verify that the new behavior is successful and productive for the employee, customers and coworkers
    3. Action Plan Created and Upside/Downside of Action Plan – support and reinforce the new action plan and assess the advantages and disadvantages of the options prior to creating the action plan
    4. Movement toward Resolution – celebrate steady and gradual improvements toward the new performance goal

Please share other tips that have made your coaching conversations productive for you and your team.

If you are interested in learning more about what skills are needed to advance your career, take a look at the Corporate Executive Leadership Academy offered at the Colorado Women’s Chamber.

 

Amy Shoemaker Headshot 2014About Amy L. Shoemaker, PHR, SHRM-CP, CMC, EMBA
Amy Shoemaker utilizes more than 25 years of business experience in human resources and training to provide strategic human resource consulting, executive coaching and leadership development, and merger and acquisition leadership integration.  She uses her 18 years experience as a vice president and strategic HR leader in entrepreneurial mid-size, and Fortune 500 corporations to exceed her clients’ expectations.  Amy develops future leaders by serving as adjunct faculty and content adviser for the Master’s in Strategic Human Resources program at The University of Denver.  She is adjunct faculty for Colorado State University’s Veterinary Management Institute and Beverage Business Institute.

Education and Certifications

  • Wichita State University, Executive Masters in Business Administration (EMBA)
  • Stanford Graduate School of Business, Human Resources Executive Program
  • Cornell University – Diversity Course Employer Adviser
  • HR Certification Institute, Professional in Human Resources (PHR)
  • Behavioral Coaching Institution, Certified Master Coach (CMC)
  • CPI 260 Leadership Assessment, Certified Practitioner
  • Emergenetics International, Certified Associate
  • Thomas Killman Instrument – Conflict Resolution Style

Professional Associations and Civic Groups

  • Colorado Women’s Chamber of Commerce, Facilitator/Founder Corporate Leadership Academy
  • Mile High SHRM Chapter, Board of Directors- Professional Development Groups
  • Northern Colorado Human Resource Association, Board of Directors, Conference Chair
  • Rocky Mountain HR People & Strategy, member

Contact:  amy@shoemakerpartnerships.com;
Office: 303-993-2364;    Mobile: 316-305-7972
Website: ShoemakerPartnerships.com
LinkedIn: Amy L Shoemaker

Let It Go and Truly Believe that You are Enough

By Jenn DeWall, Owner of Jenn DeWall Life & Career Coaching and
CWCC Member

Jenn DeWall

Book Review:  I Thought It Was Just Me (But It Isn’t): Making the Journey from “What will People Think?” To “I Am Enough” by Brene Brown

We’ve all read the books that are considered “page turners”.  We’re so engrossed in the story that we find ourselves staying up late by our bed side table lamp eating up every word.  Typically this experience and obsession with a book for me has been reserved for fiction books, either ‘chick literature’ or suspense, but Brene Brown has changed my experiences and added self-help books to my page turner selection.

In Brene Brown’s book, I Thought It Was Just Me (But It Isn’t): Making the Journey from “What will People Think?” To “I Am Enough” she invites us to learn more about the shame we experience as women.  For those of you that don’t know Brene Brown, she is a research professor and has focused the majority of her research in this book around how women experience shame.  Shame? Right? Now I know that may not get you as excited as Fifty Shades of Grey  or a Danielle Steele novel but I promise you it is.

Her book offers us the opportunity to play the lead character by applying her research on shame to our own lives.  Her book begins by sharing the many definitions of shame and circumstances that different women feel shame.  As I read other women’s stories I couldn’t help but see myself in their situations. The women’s stories ranged from not feeling adequate in their careers, not being good enough mothers, to shaming themselves for not having the perfect body. It was an epiphany for me as I realized that in so many ways of my life I was shaming myself for “not being good enough,” or not feeling like “I’m successful.” The book empowered me to make a change and start loving myself versus judging myself.

The success of the book lies in the tools she provides to build our own shame resilience.  Not only are other real women’s stories beneficial but the frosting on the cake is that you finish reading feeling inspired and that you are enough!  You truly feel one step closer in understanding and combatting the self-shame and sabotage we do to ourselves.  Another perk, she teaches us the effectiveness of empathy and how we can apply it to not only reduce the judgment on ourselves but also we can use it to connect with others. Are you a mother? A CEO? If you’re connecting with people on a daily basis you can benefit from better understanding how to empathize.

Overall this book was a quick read.  I read it in chapter increments to allow ample time to absorb the information. I was so inspired by the read that I created my own blog series for women called “Shame to Shine”.  The series is an opportunity for women to anonymously share their stories of shame and how they were able to overcome them with other women so we don’t feel alone!

What would it feel like to let it go and truly believe that you are enough?

 

About Jenn:
Jenn DeWall is a certified Life & Career Coach and Motivational Speaker for Young Professional Women. Jenn is a trailblazer who challenges the status quo and works to empower women to live beyond their comfort zones and flourish in their lives and careers. She is the founder of a women’s empowerment group as well as a leadership consultant for a local HR start up. Jenn worked in Corporate America for a large fortune 500 company for almost a decade, which empowered her to become a coach and help women become leaders in their organizations. She is a nationally accredited certified coach with an MBA whom has a vast amount of knowledge and experience on what it takes to be a leader, find happiness, and create the life you love. Jenn founded her own coaching practice, Jenn DeWall Coaching, which offers both one on one, group coaching, and motivational speaking. www.chooseyourhappylife.com

Contact Jenn at jenn@jenndewallcoaching.com or call her at (608) 206-3464.

 

Collaborate to Get Buy-in

By Brenda Hampel, Founder and Partner of Connect the Dots Consulting and
CWCC Member

CTD Transparent Logo

Getting the commitment you need from coworkers can be achieved by taking a more collaborative approach.

Collaborate to Gain Buy-in from Peers
Susan, is a senior analyst in the healthcare industry, was sure that a strong and assertive argument for her point of view always would result in the influence she needed to achieve results.  However, she was frustrated by the outcomes of recent interactions with her peers, noting that – even though she had presented strong reasoning for why she felt certain changes were important – they did not seem to understand or buy in to her recommendations.

Strategies to get buy-in:
Inspiring the commitment of her coworkers often can be achieved most effectively by taking a more collaborative approach.

  • Approach the issue from your peers’ perspective. What issues do they need to address?
  • Ask open-ended questions. Show that you are interested in their area and needs.
  • Create a win-win situation. Connect your point of view with their needs.

Susan’s Reaction:
Susan noted that she had been taught that her credibility and expertise alone “should” carry the weight and influence needed to affect organizational change and that she had not previously thought there was an effective approach.  But, she later reflected that a more collaborative approach made a lot of sense.

Outcome:
The first time Susan tried this with her counterpart in a regional office, he responded as he had with Susan’s previous style: he expected her to push instead of ask questions.  However, the next time the coworker talked with Susan, and the exchange was much more of 2-way conversation.  Susan was very pleased with the outcome.

If you are interested in learning more about what skills are needed to advance your career, take a look at the Innovative Leadership Institute offered at the Colorado Women’s Chamber.

 

Brenda Hampel HeadshotAbout Brenda
As Founder and Partner of Connect the Dots Consulting, Brenda has taken her expertise in the areas of leadership, team alignment, performance and onboarding coaching—and helps organizations design and implement solutions that combine proven methodology with practical business application.

Brenda’s specialty is in the facilitation of leadership team sessions and discussions. Her years of experience as both a corporate human resources executive and management consultant and business acumen allow her to facilitate complex and difficult discussions by creating a framework, surfacing the necessary information and input, then pulling it together and creating commitments for next steps. This powerful process allows organizations to pinpoint with laser-like accuracy the areas that need attention so they can reach their goals faster.

Brenda graduated from The Ohio State University with a BA in Communications. She is a speaker and co-author of the books published by McGraw-Hill, Solving Employee Performance Problems: How to Spot Problems Early, Take Appropriate Action, and Bring Out the Best in Everyone, Perfect Phrases for New Employee Orientation and Onboarding: Hundreds of Ready-to-use Phrases to Train and Retain Your Top Talent, and, and Talent Assessment and Development Pocket Tool Kit: How to Get the Most Out of Your Best People. The Talent and Development Assessment Pocket Toolkit, also published by McGraw-Hill