Tag Archives: Amy Shoemaker

Delegation – Delegating the Task & the Authority

By Amy L Shoemaker, President and Owner of Amy L Shoemaker Partnerships, LLC and CWCC Member

I have met some incredibly bright and talented leaders.  When the topic of “delegation” comes up, they grimace and comment that they need to get better at that!

This is a 3 part blog on Delegation Tips for Success – What to Delegate, How to Effectively Delegate and Delegating the Task and the Authority.

Delegating the Task and the Authority
Once you have identified What you can Delegate, and have planned Who and How will you delegate, it’s time to also consider how much of the task and authority for completing the task should be delegated.

  Delegate the Task Delegate the Authority
Level One Get the facts, do the research I’ll decide and retain the authority
Level Two Suggest alternatives based on the employee’s research I’ll discuss the alternatives which the employee suggests and retain the authority
Level Three Do the research, consider options and decide on a solution Review your solution with me and I retain final approval for the solution
Level Four Do the research, consider options and decide on a solution Implement the employee’s solution unless I ask to be included in advance
Level Five Do the research, consider options, and implement your solution Implement the solution and report the results to me
Level Six Do the research, consider options, and implement your solution Implement the solution and only report the results if the solution is unsuccessful
Level Seven Do the research, consider options, and implement your solution Implement the solution and reporting is not needed

Each assignment may be delegated at a different level based on the experience of the employee in completing that task.  When an employee is promoted, you may retain more authority for new assignments until you are comfortable that the employee is knowledgeable in their new responsibilities.

Please take a few minutes to decide the level of delegation for each task and the authority you are able to delegate for that task.  Then delegate the 3 projects or assignments you identified and clearly identify the action and authority you are delegating to your employees so they can be successful.

If you are interested in learning more about what skills are needed to advance your career, take a look at the Corporate Executive Leadership Academy offered at the Colorado Women’s Chamber.

 

Amy Shoemaker Headshot 2014About Amy L. Shoemaker, PHR, SHRM-CP, CMC, EMBA
Amy Shoemaker utilizes more than 25 years of business experience in human resources and training to provide strategic human resource consulting, executive coaching and leadership development, and merger and acquisition leadership integration.  She uses her 18 years experience as a vice president and strategic HR leader in entrepreneurial mid-size, and Fortune 500 corporations to exceed her clients’ expectations.  Amy develops future leaders by serving as adjunct faculty and content adviser for the Master’s in Strategic Human Resources program at The University of Denver.  She is adjunct faculty for Colorado State University’s Veterinary Management Institute and Beverage Business Institute.

Education and Certifications

  • Wichita State University, Executive Masters in Business Administration (EMBA)
  • Stanford Graduate School of Business, Human Resources Executive Program
  • Cornell University – Diversity Course Employer Adviser
  • HR Certification Institute, Professional in Human Resources (PHR)
  • Behavioral Coaching Institution, Certified Master Coach (CMC)
  • CPI 260 Leadership Assessment, Certified Practitioner
  • Emergenetics International, Certified Associate
  • Thomas Killman Instrument – Conflict Resolution Style

Professional Associations and Civic Groups

  • Colorado Women’s Chamber of Commerce, Facilitator/Founder Corporate Leadership Academy
  • Mile High SHRM Chapter, Board of Directors- Professional Development Groups
  • Northern Colorado Human Resource Association, Board of Directors, Conference Chair
  • Rocky Mountain HR People & Strategy, member

Contact:  amy@shoemakerpartnerships.com;
Office: 303-993-2364;    Mobile: 316-305-7972
Website: ShoemakerPartnerships.com
LinkedIn: Amy L Shoemaker

Delegation – How to Effectively Delegate

By Amy L Shoemaker, President and Owner of Amy L Shoemaker Partnerships, LLC and CWCC Member

I have met some incredibly bright and talented leaders.  When the topic of “delegation” comes up, they grimace and comment that they need to get better at that!

This is a 3 part blog on Delegation Tips for Success – What to Delegate, How to Effectively Delegate and Delegating the Task and the Authority.

How to Effectively Delegate
Once you have identified What you can Delegate, it’s time to plan Who and How will you delegate.

  1. Evaluate Delegation Needs – grab the list you created last week of assignments you are going to delegate and then walk through these questions.
  2. Prepare to delegate the assignment –
    1. What is the Task?
    2. What is the Responsibility level and intended results?
    3. What resources are available if the employee needs help?
    4. How does completing the assignment benefit the employee doing the work? Will the skills help advance their career or provide them with more opportunities to complete creative work?
    5. What follow up will you do?
  3. Select the right person
    1. Does the work belong to a particular position?
    2. Who has the interest or motivation to do the work?
    3. Who has the skills to do the work?
    4. Who could be challenged by doing the work?
    5. Who has time to do the work?
  4. Make the assignment – set a day and time to meet with your employee and give them the project and information you identified in step 2.
  5. Follow-up
    1. Periodically check your level of involvement – too much or not enough?
    2. Provide coaching and resources as needed
    3. Intervene when necessary to keep the project on track
    4. Share responsibility for success and “limited success” with the employee
  6. Evaluate the completed work and the process
    1. Review the work with the employee
    2. Give feedback and document their performance
    3. Obtain their feedback regarding your level of involvement – too much or not enough?

Please take a few minutes to decide when you are going to delegate the 3 projects or assignments you identified and identify what information and support you need to provide your employees so they can be successful.

If you are interested in learning more about what skills are needed to advance your career, take a look at the Corporate Executive Leadership Academy offered at the Colorado Women’s Chamber.

 

Amy Shoemaker Headshot 2014About Amy L. Shoemaker, PHR, SHRM-CP, CMC, EMBA
Amy Shoemaker utilizes more than 25 years of business experience in human resources and training to provide strategic human resource consulting, executive coaching and leadership development, and merger and acquisition leadership integration.  She uses her 18 years experience as a vice president and strategic HR leader in entrepreneurial mid-size, and Fortune 500 corporations to exceed her clients’ expectations.  Amy develops future leaders by serving as adjunct faculty and content adviser for the Master’s in Strategic Human Resources program at The University of Denver.  She is adjunct faculty for Colorado State University’s Veterinary Management Institute and Beverage Business Institute.

Education and Certifications

  • Wichita State University, Executive Masters in Business Administration (EMBA)
  • Stanford Graduate School of Business, Human Resources Executive Program
  • Cornell University – Diversity Course Employer Adviser
  • HR Certification Institute, Professional in Human Resources (PHR)
  • Behavioral Coaching Institution, Certified Master Coach (CMC)
  • CPI 260 Leadership Assessment, Certified Practitioner
  • Emergenetics International, Certified Associate
  • Thomas Killman Instrument – Conflict Resolution Style

Professional Associations and Civic Groups

  • Colorado Women’s Chamber of Commerce, Facilitator/Founder Corporate Leadership Academy
  • Mile High SHRM Chapter, Board of Directors- Professional Development Groups
  • Northern Colorado Human Resource Association, Board of Directors, Conference Chair
  • Rocky Mountain HR People & Strategy, member

Contact:  amy@shoemakerpartnerships.com;
Office: 303-993-2364;    Mobile: 316-305-7972
Website: ShoemakerPartnerships.com
LinkedIn: Amy L Shoemaker

Delegation – Developing or Dumping?

By Amy L Shoemaker, President and Owner of Amy L Shoemaker Partnerships, LLC and CWCC Member

I have met some incredibly bright and talented leaders.  When the topic of “delegation” comes up, they grimace and comment that they need to get better at that!

This is a 3 part blog on Delegation Tips for Success – What to Delegate, How to Effectively Delegate and Delegating the Task and the Authority.

What to Delegate

All of us have items on our desk which we should delegate.

  1. Let’s start with that procrastination stack, which is usually on your credenza, on the floor, or hidden in a drawer. If you were motivated to complete it, the project utilized your strengths and you were the best person to complete it – You Would Have Done It by Now!  Let’s accept that you’re not the best person to complete it and delegate the task to someone else who is a better fit.  You may have been the best person at one point in your career – however are you the best person today?
  2. Other items you should delegate include repetitive routine tasks or decisions for you which could be a development opportunity for new employees on your team.
  3. Delegating projects that cross train your employees to increase flexibility of the workload and your team’s coverage when absences occur.
  4. Delegate opportunities to use and reinforce creative talents on your team which could add value to the project.
  5. When you are more concerned that something gets done and less concerned with how it gets done, consider delegating it. Then ask yourself – is it wrong or is it different?  If there is more than one “right” way to complete a task, this is a great task to delegate and let your employees learn from completing the new responsibility.

Please take a few minutes to identify at least 3 projects or items on your desk today which could be delegated.

If you are interested in learning more about what skills are needed to advance your career, take a look at the Corporate Executive Leadership Academy offered at the Colorado Women’s Chamber.

 

Amy Shoemaker Headshot 2014About Amy L. Shoemaker, PHR, SHRM-CP, CMC, EMBA
Amy Shoemaker utilizes more than 25 years of business experience in human resources and training to provide strategic human resource consulting, executive coaching and leadership development, and merger and acquisition leadership integration.  She uses her 18 years experience as a vice president and strategic HR leader in entrepreneurial mid-size, and Fortune 500 corporations to exceed her clients’ expectations.  Amy develops future leaders by serving as adjunct faculty and content adviser for the Master’s in Strategic Human Resources program at The University of Denver.  She is adjunct faculty for Colorado State University’s Veterinary Management Institute and Beverage Business Institute.

Education and Certifications

  • Wichita State University, Executive Masters in Business Administration (EMBA)
  • Stanford Graduate School of Business, Human Resources Executive Program
  • Cornell University – Diversity Course Employer Adviser
  • HR Certification Institute, Professional in Human Resources (PHR)
  • Behavioral Coaching Institution, Certified Master Coach (CMC)
  • CPI 260 Leadership Assessment, Certified Practitioner
  • Emergenetics International, Certified Associate
  • Thomas Killman Instrument – Conflict Resolution Style

Professional Associations and Civic Groups

  • Colorado Women’s Chamber of Commerce, Facilitator/Founder Corporate Leadership Academy
  • Mile High SHRM Chapter, Board of Directors- Professional Development Groups
  • Northern Colorado Human Resource Association, Board of Directors, Conference Chair
  • Rocky Mountain HR People & Strategy, member

Contact:  amy@shoemakerpartnerships.com;
Office: 303-993-2364;    Mobile: 316-305-7972
Website: ShoemakerPartnerships.com
LinkedIn: Amy L Shoemaker

Communicate Tough Messages with Compassion

By Amy L Shoemaker, President and Owner of Amy L Shoemaker Partnerships, LLC and CWCC Member

Over 85% of Leaders dread communicating tough messages.  They want to help their employee be successful, but don’t want to hurt their feelings or risk demotivating them.  How do you communicate tough messages with compassion?

Two Purposes of a Coaching Conversation:

  1. Your first goal is to communicate your concern in a kind and compassion manner
    1. Seek to understand and be understood – describe the behaviors you are observing today and clearly communicate what success looks like!
    2. Create awareness so their behavior is a choice rather than a habit – what other options exist at work to successfully do their job
    3. Seek accuracy – clarify successful job performance and answer their questions to ensure they understand the desired performance or behavior
    4. Offer to create a shift – how can you support their new behavior
  2. Your second goal is to Produce a New Result
    1. Outcome of the Conversation – agree on the new behavior or performance with the employee
    2. Problem Solved – verify that the new behavior is successful and productive for the employee, customers and coworkers
    3. Action Plan Created and Upside/Downside of Action Plan – support and reinforce the new action plan and assess the advantages and disadvantages of the options prior to creating the action plan
    4. Movement toward Resolution – celebrate steady and gradual improvements toward the new performance goal

Please share other tips that have made your coaching conversations productive for you and your team.

If you are interested in learning more about what skills are needed to advance your career, take a look at the Corporate Executive Leadership Academy offered at the Colorado Women’s Chamber.

 

Amy Shoemaker Headshot 2014About Amy L. Shoemaker, PHR, SHRM-CP, CMC, EMBA
Amy Shoemaker utilizes more than 25 years of business experience in human resources and training to provide strategic human resource consulting, executive coaching and leadership development, and merger and acquisition leadership integration.  She uses her 18 years experience as a vice president and strategic HR leader in entrepreneurial mid-size, and Fortune 500 corporations to exceed her clients’ expectations.  Amy develops future leaders by serving as adjunct faculty and content adviser for the Master’s in Strategic Human Resources program at The University of Denver.  She is adjunct faculty for Colorado State University’s Veterinary Management Institute and Beverage Business Institute.

Education and Certifications

  • Wichita State University, Executive Masters in Business Administration (EMBA)
  • Stanford Graduate School of Business, Human Resources Executive Program
  • Cornell University – Diversity Course Employer Adviser
  • HR Certification Institute, Professional in Human Resources (PHR)
  • Behavioral Coaching Institution, Certified Master Coach (CMC)
  • CPI 260 Leadership Assessment, Certified Practitioner
  • Emergenetics International, Certified Associate
  • Thomas Killman Instrument – Conflict Resolution Style

Professional Associations and Civic Groups

  • Colorado Women’s Chamber of Commerce, Facilitator/Founder Corporate Leadership Academy
  • Mile High SHRM Chapter, Board of Directors- Professional Development Groups
  • Northern Colorado Human Resource Association, Board of Directors, Conference Chair
  • Rocky Mountain HR People & Strategy, member

Contact:  amy@shoemakerpartnerships.com;
Office: 303-993-2364;    Mobile: 316-305-7972
Website: ShoemakerPartnerships.com
LinkedIn: Amy L Shoemaker

Appreciation

By Amy Shoemaker, Founder, Amy L Shoemaker Partnerships, LLC and CWCC Member

As we prepare to celebrate the fresh beginnings of a new year, we are drawn to reflect on the people we appreciate.   How often do we take them for granted?

  • The employees who show up daily and do a great job for us; which makes our lives so much easier.
  • The sales people who go out of their way to assist us in finding the perfect gift, an outfit that fits, or serve us a warm meal. They still smile at us, even when our tone of voice is weary and stressed.
  • The person who holds the door for you, instead of letting it close in your face.
  • The neighbor who picks up your garbage can when it blows over and you never know who helped.
  • The hair stylist who compliments you when you are feeling your worst.
  • The stranger who catches your eye on the sidewalk and you exchange smiles.

During the recession, 2 Brothers started their lawn mowing business after both were laid off.  They hung a flyer on my door, so I gave them a chance.  They were always punctual, would call to reschedule if the weather didn’t cooperate, and left a well groomed yard.  I was thrilled!  Their first Christmas, they left a $25 gift card to a local butcher in the mailbox for their customers with a Thank You note.   I sent them a note in return and complimented them on all the ways I appreciated them.  One of the brothers called that Sunday and said I was the only customer who sent them a thank you note.  We talked for a half hour about their new business, how their first year had gone, what it was like to be business owners for the first time.  They were some of the special people I miss since I moved to Colorado.

I invite you throughout this new year, to express your appreciation to the people in your life who bring you joy, are dependable, show you kindness, and go out of their way to make your day pleasant.  Who are the unsung heroes at your company who do a great job every day and often get over looked?

  • The long term employee, you can always count on. They never give you grief or drama.
  • The employee in accounting who delivers your financials on a timely basis so you can make informed decisions.
  • The employee in Information Technology who updates your computer software while you are sleeping so they don’t disrupt your day.
  • The receptionist who always smiles and says Good Morning, even when you are grumpy.
  • The process people who keep your business running smoothly so you can serve your customers.

With the New Year fast approaching, who will you appreciate each day?  How do you appreciate other people throughout the year?

 

Amy Shoemaker Headshot 2014Amy Shoemaker utilizes 18 years of experience as a Vice President in
entrepreneurial mid-size, and Fortune 500 corporations, including Farm
Credit Bank, Via Christi Health Systems, Koch     Industries, Knight Ridder, Cox Communications,  Pizza Hut, multi-state banking, and Kennedy and Coe to develop her clients’ leadership skills, employee engagement and business growth. Her passion includes partnering with leaders to obtain their full potential through executive business coaching and leadership development, creating a succession plan through developing their managers, merger and acquisition leadership integration, and strategic human resource initiatives to drive business growth.

 

Leadership is an action, not a position!

By Amy L. Shoemaker, PHR, CMC, EMBA, Kennedy and Coe, LLC and
CWCC Member

Kennedy and Coe

“The leader who leads by pointing the way leaves no footprints for his followers.”  African Proverb.

When I attained my first vice president position; Sally, another vice president, came to me and shared that she had decided that since the last 3 terminations in her department were African American employees, she no longer wanted me to send her African American applicants.  I empathized with her dilemma and then reminded Sally that the 6 terminations prior to the recent 3 were all Caucasian employees; therefore I would no longer send her Caucasian applicants either.  She cried out “you cannot do that!”  I cautioned her that she had made the rule; I was simply asking her to be consistent.  Sally responded “you’ve made your point.” She left deep in thought. The next applicant Sally hired was an African American woman who was promoted to a supervisor 6 weeks later.  Two weeks later Sally apologized for the conversation, thanked me for helping her think through her decision, and for listening to her.  Years later she continued to have a trusting and deeply respectful relationship with her supervisor.

Every day we have the choice to challenge and expand people’s thinking or to say nothing.  I have invested my career as a vice president for large corporations, in developing women and minority high potential leaders for advancement to the C-Suite.  Helping leaders develop their voice at the table and learn to influence others to grow the business has been my passion.  This experience is the foundation for the CWCC Corporate Executive Leadership Academy.  Join us to explore leadership topics, including Authentic Leadership – leading with your values and beliefs, and Compassionate Courage – communicating tough decisions to allow the employee to leave the meeting with their self-respect and dignity in tact.  These are only 2 of the many leadership topics we will explore in this exciting new Academy, created uniquely for the CWCC.

Let’s hear from you: What leadership characteristics do you look for in your future leaders?  How do you recognize those characteristics as you select leaders for promotion?

Amy L. Shoemaker, PHR, CMC, EMBA has 18 years of experience as a vice president developing leaders for growing corporations such as Cox Communications, Knight Ridder, Koch Industries Inc., Pizza Hut, Via Christi Health Systems, and Farm Credit Bank of Wichita. She attained her Executive MBA and completed the Stanford Graduate School of Business HR Executive Program. Amy currently serves clients as the Director of People Growth Strategies for Kennedy and Coe, LLC in executive coaching, leadership development and the integration of leaders and employees during mergers and acquisitions.  You can reach her at 303-993-2364 or ashoemak@kcoe.com.

Amy L. Shoemaker, PHR, CMC, EMBA
Director, People Growth Strategies
Kennedy and Coe, LLC
ashoemak@kcoe.com
Loveland:  970-685-3415
Denver:     303-993-2364


About Kennedy and Coe, LLC
Founded in 1932, Kennedy and Coe, LLC serves clients domestically and internationally from offices in Kansas, Colorado, Mississippi, Wyoming, and Washington D.C. Ranked one of the top 100 largest accounting and consulting firms in the U.S., more than 200 Kennedy and Coe professionals deliver creative ideas and valuable results to clients in the industries of food and agriculture, biofuels, construction, financial institutions, manufacturing, and professional services. The firm is named a Best Accounting Firm to Work For in 2012 by Accounting Today. For more information, visit www.kcoe.com.